Papua New Guinea National Weather Service (PNGNWS) is a government institution and is the sole mandatory body in Papua New Guinea responsible for providing meteorological and climate information to the Government and people of Papua New Guinea.
PNGNWS is a member of World Meteorological Organization (WMO), thus, our functions and services strictly follow WMO standards and requirements.

We aim to scientifically improve public safety and awareness in relation to weather and climate events (past, present and future) by ensuring that our weather/climate products are disseminated on 24/7 daily basis to the general public, aviation industry, marine industry, agriculture sector, responsible authorities and other specific entities.
Subsequently, we believe that our services may implicitly (or explicitly) contribute in impacting economic and social activities within Papua New Guinea and the region.
We have a nation-wide network of weather and climate observation stations operating as either manual or automatic. Our head office is locate in Port Moresby, 7 mile, Skidrow Street, near Jacksons International Airport.

Papua New Guinea National Weather Service
Jackson's International Airport
Skidrow Street
7 Mile
P.O BOX 1240
BOROKO
National Capital District
Papua New Guinea
Phone: +675 325 2788, Ex: 109
FAX: +675 325 7255 / +675 325 5201

Click the markers on the map to see the weather forecasts for that center

Climate of Port Moresby

Port Moresby has two seasons, the wet or northwest (NW) monsoon season and the dry or southeast (SE) trade winds season. Dry season sets over Port Moresby around April and the wet season around December. It has an annual rainfall of 1096.5 mm (43.17 inch) and a maximum temperature of 32.5°C (90.5°F) in December and a minimum temperature of 22.5°C (72.5°F) in August (figure 01).

For the month of November the total rainfall is 74 mm (2.9 inch) and the maximum temperature of 32.4°C (90.32°F) and minimum temperature of 24.0°C (75.2°F) (figure 01). November is also the transitional month when the southeast (SE) trades weaken and the northwest (NW) monsoon sets in over Port Moresby (figure 02).

Figure 01

Climate averages for Port Moresby (1981-2010), maximum temperature is reached in December and Minimum in August.

Figure 02

Average seasonal changes in Port Moresby (1981-2010), annual surface wind changes (u, v) indicating onset of wet (+u, -v) and dry seasons (-u, +v). u (blue line) is the east-west component of surface winds and v (red line) is the north-south component.

APEC Weather Forecasts
Wet Season Outlook

The seasonal outlook released in October 2018 using RIMES Dynamical FOCUS model down-scaled for Papua New Guinea, shows normal to above normal (AB) rainfall for New Guinea Islands and below normal to normal rainfall for the rest of the country (Figue 03). The RIMES Dynamical FOCUS model outputs were closely consistent with the Australian tailored Statistical SCOPIC model outlook. RIMES Dynamical FOCUS Model probabilistic seasonal Forecast for the next 3 months, Oct-Dec-Jan rainfall shows 0-25% below normal (AN) rainfall for Southern region, 0-15% above normal (AN) rainfall for Highlands region, 0-15% below normal (BN) for the MOMASE region and 0-32% above normal (AN) for New Guinea Islands (figure 04).

Figure 03

RIMES Dynamical FOCUS Model out shows the seasonal rainfall departures for Oct-Dec-Jan from the seasonal average. Positive departures (>20%) below the seasonal average are shown in red, the moderate departures (<20%) in green and above normal (>30%) in blue. The white white colour shows no forecast available.

Figure 04

RIMES Dynamical FOCUS Model probabilistic seasonal Forecast for the next 3 months, Nov-Oct-Dec rainfall shows normal (N) to above normal (AN) rainfall for New Guinea Islands, below normal (BN) to Normal (N) rainfall for MOMASE, Highlands and Southern regions.

Figure 05

Australian BOM, POAMA model Sea Surface Temperature anomalies for the NINO 3.4 region, the El Niño onset during December would be later than usual, although not unprecedented.

Figure 06

Australian BOM, POAMA model Sea Surface Temperature anomalies in the IOD region. A positive IOD event typically reduces spring rainfall across Papua New Guinea, and can exacerbate any potential El Niño driven rainfall deficiencies.

Nov-Dec-Jan Seasonal Forecast
  • Neutral to slight El Nino Conditions will remain throughout the wet season
  • Normal (N) to above Normal (AN) rainfall for New Guinea Islands region
  • Below normal (BN) rainfall for Milne Bay, Central and parts of Highlands Provinces
  • Risk of Land Slides in the Highlands, deforested areas
  • RIMES Statistical Analysis and Dynamical Model Outputs were consistent with Australian Statistical SCOPIC Model and ECMWF Outlooks
  • Below Normal (BN) to normal (N) rainfall for MOMASE, Highlands and Southern regions
  • Risk of drought in Western, Gulf, Central, Milne Bay and parts of Highlands Provinces.
  • 50-60 % chance of tropical cyclone forming within or passing through Papua New Guinea
Seasonal (Nov-Dec-Jan) Output Impact Base Forecast
Seasonal Forecast Region Potential Impacts
Normal (N) to above normal (AN) rainfall New Guinea Islands region
  • Risk of Flooding
  • Risk of Water borne diseases
  • Risk of Lightening strikes
  • Risk of Land Slips and Land Slides in deforested areas
Below normal (BN) to normal (N) rainfall MOMASE and Highlands regions
  • Risk of Drought
  • Risk of Water shortages
  • Risk of Land Slips and Land Slides in the Highlands
Below normal (BN) rainfall Southern region
  • Risk of Drought
  • Risk of Water shortages
  • Possible Risk to Hydro Power generation
Slightly stronger NW monsoon surges MOMASE, New Guinea Islands and Southern regions
  • Risk to bush material houses
  • Risk to sea crafts and vessels
Moderate to slightly higher seasCoral, Solomon and Bismarck seas including the Vitiaz Strait
  • Risk to bush material houses
  • Risk to sea crafts and vessels
50-60% chance of tropical cyclone forming within or passing through Papua New GuineaCoral and Solomon Seas regions
  • Risk to bush material houses
  • Risk to seas crafts and vessels
  • Risk of flooding
  • Risk for Communities living within the identified regions
Current Weather Situation

A Trough over the Northern parts of Papua New Guinea is causing Thunderstorm activity. This trough extends to a Low East of Solomon Islands. Southeasterly Trade winds are bringing hot and dry conditions to Southern parts of the country, including Port Moresby (figures 07 and 08)

Figure 7

Latest satellite animation.

Figure 08

The above image shows latest streamline analysis from Darwin RSMC at 10pm, 14-11-2018.

Outlook for the Week

Most shower and thunderstorm activity to be over northern parts of the country (MOMASE & New Guinea Islands) and Highlands regions (Figures 09 & 10). Expect mostly dry and hot conditions over Port Moresby with some chance of shower activity extending into the southern parts of the country towards the end of the week (Figures 09 & 10).

Figure 09

Australian Bureau of Meteorology Access Model Gradient winds for 10 am on Friday 16th November 2018.

Figure 10

Australian Bureau of Meteorology Access Model surface pressure and rainfall for 4pm on Friday 16th November 2018.

Summary: Weekly Weather Outlook Impacts
Expected Weather Region Potential Impacts
Hot and dry conditions with chance of shower and thunderstorm activity late next weekSouthern parts of the country including Port Moresby
  • Risk of Heat Exhaustion
  • Risk of Drought
Showers and thunderstormsNorthern parts of the country, including New Guinea Islands and the Highlands
  • Risk of Flash Flooding
  • Risk of Lightening Strikes
  • Risk of Hail in the Highlands
  • Risk of Landslides in the Highlands
10-20 % chance of low moving into or forming within the Papua New GuineaSolomon sea
  • Risk to bush material houses
  • Risk to small crafts and vessels
  • Risk of Flash Flooding
  • Risk of Lightening Strikes
  • Risk of Landslides
Marine Forecasts